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Knitting And The Creative Art Of Parking

So I’ve been working funny days this week, and in between times I’ve been knitting and knitting and knitting an Yvette hat because, (i) it’s getting seriously nippy round here and the Stoic Spouse nicked my other hat, and (ii) my friend gave me some chunky, colourful yarn that’s perfect for the job. At precisely 3pm this afternoon I’m due to take my place outside in the twinnage’s school playground in order to help with the class cake sale, and if I’m going to stand out there freezing my bits off for very long, I NEED a hat. I also need some cakes, so I’d better go and pop the oven on in a minute…

Knitting at the twinnage's music group.

Knitting at the twinnage’s music group.

So all week I’ve been driving my car (known without any affection at all as the Stinkwagon) through the crisp and misty winter Oxfordshire countryside to work. The driving is the easy bit. Parking at the hospital is… a tad trickier. Unless you’re super-early for work, you need to be a wee bit strategic. Really, creative parking is an essential vocational skill. Given that all hospitals have parking issues, they should cover this stuff in clinical training.

A bit of progress, as I walk the streets (NO, not like THAT!) of Oxfordshire.

A bit of progress, as I walk the streets (NO, not like THAT!) of Oxfordshire.

Various options exist:-

  • Legitimate parking spaces. Congratulations: not only are you early for work, but you can also bask in your moral rectitude as you roll neatly into a designated space. Of course the downside is that any time you venture near the car park during the day, a convoy of hopeful drivers will follow you slowly and dolefully, sensing the blood of a possible imminently available space, and promising themselves that they’ll definitely get up for work earlier tomorrow in order to avoid this agony. That’ll be awkward if you’re just popping out to your car to eat your sandwiches in peace.
Yup, still knitting. Still, erm, streetwalking.

Yup, still knitting. Still, erm, streetwalking.

  • Not-strictly-proscribed places that nobody has previously thought of. We’re all creative people here, yes? Well some folk apply that creativity to their parking. You’ve gotta admire them for their originality in manoeuvring their car on to the old tennis court or up a tree, but let’s allow them to test out that newfound option first to see whether they get into trouble before you risk parking there tomorrow.
Still at it.

Still at it.

  • The mildly forbidden areas that would, in a more benevolent universe, be legitimate parking spaces. So let’s get something straight. Enthusiasm for your job is a good thing: everyone appreciates the employee who goes the extra mile. But the chap who painted the double yellow no-parking lines at work took the ‘going the extra mile’ concept a tad too literally and wiped out yards and yards of roadside space in the process. The cautious-by-nature and the super-well-behaved will avoid these spots, so really they’re just parking areas reserved for the mildly reckless. Count me in.
No way is that 11 inches.

No way is that 11 inches. (Oo-er…)

  • The ‘No (Parking) And I Mean It This Time’ places. If double yellow lines mean ‘no parking’, then double red lines mean ‘really really no parking and I’m not joking’ in the same tone of voice that your mum used when you were six and she was properly cross with you. Sometimes they’ll even add a couple of traffic cones as well, which ramps it up to ‘RIGHT, THAT’S IT! DO THAT ONE MORE TIME AND I’LL CONFISCATE YOUR TOYS’. Parking here is the best way to get a photo of your car emailed round the entire hospital with a sarcastic description of your idiocy. Of course if you’re madly proud of your car then you might want everyone to see a picture of it, but leaving your Lamborghini in the ambulance bay probably wasn’t the cleverest way of achieving that, yeah?
If I stay facing front, dyou think they'll notice that my hat is half-finished? No?

If I stay facing front, d’you think they’ll notice that my hat is half-finished? No?

And would you like to know the really sad thing? When I’d taken the selfie above, I decided to do a bit more knitting, but I couldn’t find my hat. Until I happened to glance at that picture again. Sigh.

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Knitting A Pond, Crocheting The Lillies

So yesterday, TheTwistedYarn passed the happy milestone of 100 000 views. I’m sure that a few of these were folks landing here accidentally and scurrying rapidly through the labyrinthine corridors of the ‘Yarn on their way in search of a site about molecular biology or how to mend vacuum cleaners. And that’s OK: we’re inclusive here, though not very informative about molecular biology. But hopefully, the vast, vast majority of these hits were by colour-loving yarn-wielders, and I really hope that some people have been convinced that with sticks/hooks and string, you really can make pretty much anything (as long as you practise new techniques on scrappy spare yarn first).

Anyway, a heartfelt THANK YOU to every reader and commenter. If it wasn’t too early in the day for drinking, I’d be raising a glass to y’all.

And now, a thought about circles. I’m working on crocheting the garden of the big crazy house project, and I decided to include a little round fishpond. The water is knitted, in order to give a smoother surface than I could manage with crochet. But how to knit a circle? Just in case you ever need to know the answer, I found a solution on catchloops.com’s blog: the formula for calculating the number of stitches on each row, as you work across the circle. It’s based on a combination of the formula for calculating the chord of a circle combined with calculating number of stitches based on gauge. Clever, huh?

So I got knitting…

Knitting a circle.

Knitting a circle.

 

And sixty rows of increasing then decreasing length later, I had myself a perfect circle! Wa-hey!

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One pond! Now it needs some water-lilies and some goldfish, don’t you think? Here’s a start:-

Crochet Lilly at TheTwistedYarn.com

 

I made up the lilly design. Using embroidery thread and a 2mm hook, I worked 5 loops each consisting of 5 chain stitches, with an anchoring slip stitch into the fabric below in between each loop. image

Then I worked up one side and down the other of each petal loop. I started at the bottom and chained 3, then worked a further 4 double crochets (US terminology, so trebles if you’re in the UK) to get to the tip of the petal. Then I chained 1 before working 5 double crochets down the other side of the petal. Finally I worked a slip stitch into the centre of the flower before moving on to the next petal. And so on:-

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And finally I sewed a few last stitches to anchor the petals in a sticking-up position. Done! Here’s a diagram:-

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And now if you’ll excuse me, I’m all about the goldfish…

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Subverting The Medium Of Colourwork

Friday, my fine friend, you have been a long time coming this week. And by the way, ANYONE WHO RECEIVED AN EMAIL NOTIFYING YOU OF A BAG PATTERN POST THAT DOESN’T YET EXIST, PLEASE SEE THE END OF THIS POST!

Anyway, the Knitting And Crochet Guild / Yarn Stories competition is closing. Did you enter? Best o’ luck if you did. I can’t wait to see everyone’s entries when they’re shown online.

For anyone who hasn’t seen it, the Knitting and Crochet Guild promotes both crafts within the UK and also houses a collection of historical and modern samples of knitted/crocheted objects, as well as yarn and associated paraphernalia. Anyone with a passion for these crafts can join, whether you’ve been knitting/hooking for a week or a century. The competition involved designing and working a 15cm square in either knitting or crochet, with a design inspired by artefacts in the collection. The best entries are apparently going to be sewn together to make a blanket, and the winner will receive lots of luscious Yarn Stories yarn.

Anyway, being more than a little in love with stranded colourwork, I was drawn to this image of a higgledy-piggledy pile of intricate fairisle jumpers. Some of the colour combinations are maybe reminiscent of decades past, but the designs are timeless, and I decided to try and capture both of these elements in my entry. Perhaps I should have spotted that this was quite ambitious in a little square 36 stitches by 45 stitches. Oh well, you live and learn… or possibly just live, in my case.

First, to the yarn. I chose some Yarn Stories merino double knit in a combination of shades inspired by the ’70s.

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Can you spot the tell-tale signs of frenzied package-opening?

And then I got out some knitter’s graph paper and began to doodle, and erase, and doodle, and erase, and fetch green tea, and doodle, because I love the fun and the freedom of creating stranded designs. And eventually the green tea ran out, and I came up with this:-

stranded jumper design

What?! You took an entire pot of green tea to come up with THAT?!

The problem is, I decided to go a bit off piste with the whole colourwork malarkey, and instead of sticking to a cosy, sensible two shades per row, I used up to four shades per row, and worked a sort of stranded-intarsia hybrid (“strandtarsia”??) that made for some – ahem – not especially tidy knitting. Don’t try this at home, people: it will hurt your fingers and it will hurt your brain. But how else was a girl to cram a world of orange-laden 1970s shades into one small square? So here we have it (after a certain amount of swearing): my tiny take on the Guild’s penchant for fairisle jumpers:-

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And though I’d usually show you the back of a piece of stranded work because, y’know, the Knitting Police demand that you show off your ultra-neat floats, I think I’ll pass on doing that just now, and show you another shot of the front instead:-

fairisle jumper design

Yikes, please don’t look closely. I used intarsia to keep the three strong colours all within the outline of the jumper, and worked a mad jumble of twisted floats as I tried to marshal the chaos into an identifiable representation of a jumper.

I Will Not Be Doing This Again.

Meanwhile thank you for your kind comments about the IVF after my last entry. Posts may continue to be a bit more infrequent than usual for another month or so, after which time, normal regular silliness will return.

________________________________

Now, for anyone who subscribes to this blog by email, you will have received a message a few days ago saying there’s a new post up with the crochet house bag pattern inside. But had you clicked on the link, you’d have seen nothing much of anything other than a load of ellipses and drafted notes. I was working on the pattern and accidentally hit ‘publish’. Yikes! I clawed back the post, I clawed back notifications from every social medium out there, but the one thing I couldn’t retrieve was the messages sent out automatically by email. Apologies. Blame my IVF brain. The pattern is coming soonish, but it needs a goodish chunk more work before it’ll be done.

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And Then We Disappeared Off To Herefordshire

So anyway, my parents (the Twisted Seniors) have a long-established tradition of pulling up their tent-pegs and moving to a completely different part of the country every 10-15 years or so. They’re at it again as we speak, and have just sold their home in beautiful rural Herefordshire, ready to come and share a county with us here in Oxfordshire. With the move imminent, the Toddler Twinnage and I decided to make a may-or-may-not-be-the-last visit to Herefordshire, whilst the Stoic Spouse stayed behind and kept the home fires burning. I hope you don’t mind photos? This post has lots of photos.

I was reading your comments on the Skirt Post whilst we were there, and yes I did notice how many of you said I should have posted a picture of me wearing the skirt. Yeeks! OK here’s a hasty shot, but I’m deliberately excluding most of the waistband because I want to add more rows to it now that I’m back home, and really make it a lovely purple feature. And I’m still pondering stranded braces… But yes, this is me, in the skirt… The skirt that you will know from my previous post is held together entirely with hairspray… I might wear it to work tomorrow.

stranded skirt

Whilst we were in Herefordshire, I did a little work on a sock. A Noro Kureyon Sock yarn sock, no less, that most definitely deserves a future post of its own, given the beautiful-but-highly-strung nature of this yarn. Yes those are toddler twin fingers a-grabbing at my toes.

sock with toddler

But you can’t visit Herefordshire in springtime and not go outdoors, so we admired the blossom in the garden:-

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Yup, those be twins in the background. They’re probably about to do something incredibly naughty.

…before wandering up the track behind my parents’ house to take a look at the landscape. It’s so quiet there, apart from the birdsong.

Herefordshire countryside

As the weather has been warming, the sheep have been shedding handfuls of fluff that I’d just love to take home and use as an excuse to learn to spin at last. I’ve been watching lots of YouTube videos about how to spin, but obviously I’m not about to give it a go. Of course not. No way. Definitely not.

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I quite like the bit of the walk in the photo below. It’s excellent for toddler galloping, and there’s a little pond where you can watch teeny-weeny freshwater shrimps and whirligig beetles doin’ their funky wriggly thing. When I was a child, we had a tiny stream running across the bottom of the garden, but despite the fact that the water was so polluted it made my skin turn weird, you could always find little freshwater shrimps and water lice hiding under stones. I spent many happy, absorbed hours delighting in this fact and also damming the stream and nearly flooding next door’s garden. Anyway, back to Herefordshire:-

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Being spring, there are ducklings. Here was a family of 14 fluffy little darlings!

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Do you see that funny-looking hill-top on the horizon towards the left of the photo below? That’s Credenhill, an Iron Age hill fort, one of the biggest in the country and probably built well over 2000 years ago in approximately 350BC. If I visit my parents again before they move, I can go there and bring you some photos if you’d like? As long as you don’t mind the photos featuring a spot of knitting in their foreground…

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And look!!! Most exciting of all, we found a nest of moorhen eggs:-

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And cheating slightly, because this is in the garden of a Herefordshire castle rather than anywhere wild, look at these tulips!

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When I first met the Stoic Spouse, he said that May was his favourite month of the year. I think I might just be coming round to his way of thinking. I just hope we get to visit Herefordshire again before my parents leave.

…And whilst we’re pottering about photographing things, I confess to a tiny shy smile every time I go into a newsagent or supermarket and see this:-

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…because I can’t help but be a teeny bit excited that my interview is inside the back cover and my first column is coming soon.

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Distracted From The Knitting By Cake

So there I was, sitting innocently in the garden drafting the skirt post, and the post about looking round the Spectrum Yarns mill, when I was rudely interrupted by a silly idea that just would not go away. An idea that had nowt to do with knitting or crochet. And whilst I tried my hardest to concentrate on telling you about the luscious yarn being worked at that mill, this pesky idea grabbed me by the brain cell and dragged me all the way into the kitchen, whereupon it told me to look for some fruit, some bowls, and a cake tin. I swear that the idea chuckled a bit as I did its bidding.

The idea was this: wouldn’t it be fun to bake a sponge cake which was laden with different fruits in different sections, so you’d never quite know what you were going to bite into? (Am I making sense at all?)

So I poked about in the fruit bowl (and the fridge and freezer, it not being fruit season), and came up with an apple, some raspberries, a pineapple, blueberries, and a large squishy plum. I chopped up about a tablespoon-full of each. Yum! 🙂

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And then I made up a quick sponge cake (recipe at bottom), one of those easy cheaty ones that involves just chucking everything in a bowl together and beating it until your arm hurts.

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(Serious bakers will be snorting in derision at this point. Fair enough.)

From then on, I really was winging it. I divided the mixture into five bowls, and stirred one type of fruit into each:-

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And then I dropped spoonfuls of each into the cake tin, keeping each fruit to its own patch in the tin, but acknowledging there’d be a certain amount of splurging and merging. What I DIDN’T do was pile one fruity mixture on top of another, because both fruits would probably have sunk to the bottom together during baking. Nearly done:-

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And then into the oven it went, producing the most mouth-watering smells. Look!

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Mmmmmmmm….

Want to see inside? Well this is the point where I remind you that this is a knitting/crochet blog, not a baking blog, and if you’re a serious constructor of cakes, you may want to look elsewhere. Really, I should have adjusted the consistency of each section of the cake to allow for the runny-ness of the fruit it contained but hey, life’s too short already. But you know what? I have cake and I don’t care. 🙂

imageRecipe (massively adapted years ago from one in Mary Berry’s Fast Cakes book:-

9oz / 225g self-raising flour

9oz / 225g soft margarine

9oz / 225g caster sugar

3 eggs, beaten

2tbsp milk

1tsp baking powder

(And the fruits, obviously, chopped small. Roughly a heaped tbsp of each. I used five different ones.)

Combine everything except the fruit. Beat into oblivion with a wooden spoon. Then follow instructions above. Bake in an 8-inch / 20cm diameter deep cake tin at 180C for about 55 mins, or until surface is golden and springy to the touch.

AND NOW I REALLY AM GOING TO FINISH THAT SKIRT POST! (Thank you to kind commenters who asked about it.)

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Easy Crochet Christmas Decorations, Part One

Right, people, it’s crochet time. Hooks to the ready, my fine fearless friends. Mince pie, anyone? That’s it – do pass the plate round.

We’re getting properly festive here at the ‘Yarn. The tree is up. The Toddler Twinnage is over-excited. The Stoic Spouse is…. stoic. And there are decorations, especially the little trees, Santa, paper chains, wreaths, and candles that I knitted the other week. But now we’ve got our hooks all ready, it’d be a shame not to use them, so shall we make some crochet versions of all of these? Please say yes.

OK, let’s take it from the top. Here’s a very easy little crocheted Christmas tree. The method is exactly the same as for the knitted version. Find some lovely green DK (aka light worsted) yarn. I’m using Fyberspates Vivacious in ‘Deep Forest’, which is just about perfect for a subtly variegated, leafy effect. Look!

Easy Crochet Christmas Tree

Easy Crochet Christmas Tree

You’ll need to work a square in double crochet (US terminology, so that’s treble crochet here in the UK). With a hook sized to match your yarn, loosely chain between 15 and 22 stitches, depending on whether you want a smaller or larger tree. (I recommend making a variety of sizes if you’re working a little plantation of these trees.) Turn your work, chain 3, then work back working double crochets (US terms) into every stitch. Repeat until you’ve worked a beautiful square. Woah, you’re ahead of me! Look, I’ve only got this far:-

a in progress w

When you’re done, enjoy a mug of lovely mulled wine. Aaahhhhhhhhhhhh. 🙂

Now for the making up. Follow the directions exactly as for the knitted version. In short, fold the square nearly-but-not-quite in half, as in this photo. It really won’t work well if you fold it completely in half, so it does need to be like this:-

a1

Roll the tree up from one side across to the other, using the long tails to sew up the base and a curved seam up the back from bottom to top. You’ll need a smidgeon of toy stuffing to bulk out the top part of the tree.

a sewing up w

So far, so good, but isn’t it just begging for a few decorations? As before, I’m using tiny metallic pipe cleaners for tinsel and to shape the star on top, and metallic beads for baubles. But feel free to go for it with the sequins and the glitter, too. Express your inner bling, people. 🙂 Quick tip: if you stick the ends of the pipe cleaners into the crocheted fabric, they should stay pretty still without having to sew them. Easy, no? Hurrah! Here’s the finished tree, standing slightly aloof from its knitted colleagues:-

Knitted And Crochet Christmas Trees

Knitted And Crochet Christmas Trees

Now, one more easy-peasy crochet make for today, and then we’ll leave the crochet paper chains and wreaths for my next post, OK?

So, here’s a very quick and simple candle. It’s even easier than the Christmas tree. First, you need to crochet a rectangle in pale cream yarn. You can use any thickness of yarn and you can use either single crochet or double crochet stitches (US crochet terms). In the example below, I’ve worked double crochets in chunky yarn, which gives quite an uneven surface, but if you want a very smooth, realistic surface you could use quite thin yarn in single crochet stitches.

a candle w

Now, how big a rectangle to make? Well, the example in the photograph was made from a rectangle 24cm wide and 12cm high. So perhaps start with that, and then vary the size any way you like. (I wouldn’t recommend attempting a tall narrow candle, though, unless you want to reinforce it with wire.) I rolled up the rectangle loosely from the side, and sewed it down the back using the cast off tail of yarn. Making the wick is easy. Take a narrow metallic pipe cleaner. Leave a 2cm end to poke into the candle, then bend round to make a little circle for the centre of the flame, then twist round again to make a bigger loop that you can pinch at the top to form the tip of the flame. Cut the pipe cleaner so that both ends have 2cm spare. Twist the two ends together and poke them into the crocheted fabric. And you’re done!!

Would you like another mince pie? Oh…. they seem to have all gone. I don’t know how that happened… Um…

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Summer flowers

So, you’ll maybe remember that in spring, I made a few collages of seasonal flowers in a rainbow pattern, here and here. T’was fun. Well, the season has marched on, as is its wont. And now we have summer flowers, with green ones even harder to find. Fortunately my lovely, horticulturally-talented neighbour has some green flowers to complete my montage. Witness:-

Summer Flower Montage

Summer Flower Montage

Whilst I’m florally rambling like a wisteria on an ancient thatched cottage, let me tell you about the hollyhocks. I mention them now because in our Oxfordshire village in July, I sometimes fear that there’s a by-law compelling the growing of hollyhocks, which I’m clearly violating. Am I the only person who doesn’t grow them? I must get some.

Once, last year, we were relaxing in a pub garden beside the road in another Oxfordshire village. Suddenly, one of the Stoic Spouse’s colleagues screeched to a halt in her car beside us, with an alarming manic glint in her eye. Apparently she was circling the neighbourhood looking for hollyhocks from which to steal the seeds: people take their hollyhocks seriously round here. Right, some pictures, yes?

hollyhock 1

hollyhock 1

Hollyhock 2, photobombed by toddler twinnage

Hollyhock 2, photobombed by toddler twinnage

And finally….

Hollyhocks 3, just to prove that they come in all colours.

Hollyhocks 3, just to prove that they come in all colours.

They are pretty, but oh so brief.

Right, back to the knitted mandala.

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The Yarn-Bombing Continues

The yarn-bombing of our brewery home is spreading slowly, very slowly, like one of those garden weeds that – once you initially notice it’s there – you keep spotting more and more outbreaks, until you realize that it’s actually everywhere.

Stand still for too long (say, approximately a week) in our house and you risk being measured up for adornment with crochet, or perhaps having your extremities entrelacced (ouch). Consider y’self warned, my friend. Unfortunately the Toddler Twinnage move too fast to be effectively yarn-bombed as yet: I’m waiting until they slow down into lethargic hormonal teenagers before I attack. (I’m sure they won’t mind in the least – it’s not as though teenagers are bothered about looking cool or anything.) As for the Stoic Spouse, his stoicism doesn’t quite extend to knitwear, and certainly not to this.

So for now, I’ve had to stick to adorning inanimate objects.

Anyway, we’ve long had a row of grown-from-seed basil plants on the kitchen windowsill. They make a hairy herbal hedge that affords our poor neighbours some privacy from the sight of us bickering about The Correct Way In Which To Load The Dishwasher*. The pots were dull, though. Witness! (Photo taken before the plants got big: it’s like a proper little hedge, now.)

Kitchen Windowsill Before

Kitchen Windowsill Before

That’s not very good, is it? Needs a bit of colour, don’t you think?

So I bought some cheap and cheery nuclear-holocaust-proof acrylic, dug out a crochet hook, and started ‘bombing. What do you think so far? :-

Crochet-bombed flower pots

Crochet-bombed flower pots

For the main body of each pot, I used a spare pot to get the size right. I started about a centimetre above the bottom of the pot (because I don’t want the bottom of this thing soaked in water every couple of days), and chain-stitched until I had a ring that fitted very snugly, joining with a slip stitch at the end. I then worked rounds of double-crotchets (US terminology) upwards, increasing whenever necessary to ensure that the sleeve got wider at the same rate that the pot did. A very very snug fit was essential, and I paused to try the sleeve on the pot at the end of almost every row.  For the last round I added some picot edging.

Then, of course, I mooched around online until I found patterns for crocheted flowers that looked pretty.

As for the flowerpot saucer, I started the initial round slightly smaller than the circumference of the saucer’s base, because I wanted the sleeve to begin just out of sight beneath the base. It thus pulls inwards underneath the saucer and holds itself in place. I then worked upwards and outwards in the same way as for the pot. When I got to the top, I crocheted a super-tight round with a few decreases, so that the circumference of the last round was smaller than that of the top of the saucer, meaning that it stretched inwards and held itself in place at the top.

As I’ve said before, Am I making sense?

And as I’ve also said before, Pretty, no?

Yarn-bombed flower pot

Yarn-bombed flower pot

* A subject in which I’m undoubtedly right.

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More crochet flowers

Evenin’ all.

Project blog header continues.

Flowers for its edge are blooming, mostly of the crocheted variety, but also a few knitted ones. And there’s a butterfly. This is yesterday and today’s haul:-

crocheted flowers

crocheted flowers

And here’s the total group so far:-

crocheted and knitted flowers

crocheted and knitted flowers

I’ll sew them around the edge of the blog header when they’re all done. I’m a little out of my comfort zone with this stuff, because I like big, solid, get-lost-in-the-detail-for-weeks projects rather than making small things, but it’s fun to learn something new. One thing I’ve realized both from making the knitted family dolls and from this, is how small projects are wonderful for practising and extending your skills. Being all different shapes, they involve every kind of stitch and increase/decrease within a small piece of work. I wish I’d done more of this sort of thing when I was first learning.

Anyway, onwards. When I posted pictures of the blog header panel, I forgot to show you the back. It’s stranded work, so of course you need to inspect the reverse! Quick point before I show you: if I’m knitting something stranded to wear, like a skirt, I’ll only ‘allow’ very short floats across the back (maximum three stitches), because I don’t want them to get caught on anything. If I have a run of any colour that’s longer than three stitches, I catch the yarn behind the working thread. But I was more relaxed when knitting the blog header – after all, its life’s work will be nothing more strenuous than being photographed once. So there are floats of up to five stitches. It looks like this:-

reverse of blog header

reverse of blog header

 

I’m loving this project – the freedom of doing something designed from scratch.

 

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Knitting is in fashion

So, d’you think this new-fangled* knitting malarkey will catch on?

Actually, I fear that we’re becoming trendy. This makes me a little nervous, because anything that is currently trendy will, perforce, soon be deeply untrendy.

Take today, for example. I had to pop out in the car to a nearby town. On the way, I passed this bus stop:-

The Big Knit

The Big Knit

Then I stopped for petrol. It seems that Cadbury has gone all knitted for Christmas. Obviously I had to buy the following items so that I could photograph them properly for this blog:-

Cadbury chocolate: look at that stockinette!

Cadbury chocolate: look at that stockinette!

Look how neat that stockinette is!

Then I saw this:-

Fair isle Dairy Milk

Fair isle Dairy Milk

Look! Fair isle! (Well sort of – it would be if there weren’t such enormous gaps between the snowflakes.) As a stranded knitter, this made my heart sing. I could knit chocolate!

And today was my wedding anniversary: look at the card that the stoic spouse gave me:-

knitted anniversary card

knitted anniversary card

And finally, I bought some Christmas cards:-

knitted Christmas cards

knitted Christmas cards

Back home with my chocolates and cards, I had to sample the chocolate – purely in the interests of research, you understand:-

researching knitted chocolate

researching knitted chocolate

And the conclusion of all this rigorous research? I fear we might be getting a bit too trendy.

*I hope you realize that this phrase was written with tongue very firmly inserted in cheek.

 

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